Words Your GP Didn’t Let You Finish #endometriosisawareness

Words Your GP Didn’t Let You Finish #endometriosisawareness

Words Your GP Didn't Let You Finish

#endometriosisawareness

Chloe Hodder

Founder, Green Body Mojo

If you have endometriosis or dysmenorrhea (painful periods), you’re probably a bit of a connoisseur when it comes to pain.

The word “pain” is a Pandora’s Box. Those four letters encapsulate so very much.

Inuit’s captured our imagination with their reported “Hundred Words for Snow”, but we too have different words for it – ask any skier or mountaineer. 

Yet pain is just, well, pain.

This is one of the pivotal problems we encounter when visiting the GP – it’s hard to get across your degree of pain. Their Scale of 1-10 is entirely subjective and you end up being demoted from “9 – my limbs are accounted for” to “a bit of a tummy ache”.

…This is not exclusive to male GP’s (though that line was a corker after I had been curled up in fetal position on the bathroom floor, shaking, vomiting, wet through from sweat and close to passing out). Sadly, I’ve known some uterus-bearing GP’s to be more dismissive, those who “have period pain too and just get on with it”. 

GP’s are under pressure, I appreciate that, but with that salary, I don’t feel too bad for them.

Painkillers can be used as a stop-gap, as it is hard-impossible to function when you’re in pain, but I don’t believe in using them long term without first exhausting all other options.

Further reading: NSAIDS – The Painful Truth Behind Painkillers

The long and short of it?

Pain(ful periods) need to be investigated.

Recent research shows that there is now an average of 7.5 years between women first seeing a doctor about their symptoms and receiving a firm diagnosis.

endometriosis-uk.org

My diagnosis took over a decade.

…Yet, my symptoms of an acute attack were extreme.

  • Vomiting
  • Feverish (hot and drenched in sweat)
  • Prolonged period (mind the pun) of faintness.
  • Becoming unconscious on a number of occasions (and, again, prolonged unconsciousness, not just momentary).
  • Barely able to move.

…And then there was the pain.

  • The deep-seated pain that felt as if it were radiating out of my very my bones, like a constant low-level hum.
  • The sharp stabbing pain that felt like a frenzied attack.
  • The heavy pain that pulled me down to the ground, literally.
  • The toxic pain that felt as if my body was waging war on itself.
  • …And then there was the cramping pain that felt like my insides were twisting into knots. 

I could usually pre-empt an acute attack by the ominous, uneasy feeling that would build, call me Nostradamus, and would have to get myself to a bathroom ASAP to lay on the floor until it passed. The worst of which would burn through in 45 mins – 1.5hrs. 

But during those 2700 – 5400 seconds… All layered up, this became a monstrous pain that felt as if I wouldn’t survive it.

Afterwards, I would feel completely numb as if my body was in shock. It probably was.

This sounds all very melodramatic to anyone that has never experienced their uterus-gone-wild, but this is coming from someone who is pretty darn stoical and thinker-oriented (as opposed to Feely-McFeelerson). 

One time I went to deliver the village postscript to a certain house and their dog ran out and attacked my leg, and I was like, I’ll just leave this in the porch, shall I?

…Then hobbled into the porch with the dog still attached to my leg.

I’m not someone who likes to make a fuss. But I will here because I know I’m not the only one with this experience. 

So for anyone who has ever visited a GP and been patronised over their “bit of tummy ache” or cut off mid-sentence and told to “just take ibuprofen”, I’d like to offer you the space to say what your GP didn’t let you finish. 

…Because if you went to your GP with those symptoms, and left out the part about being on your period, you’d be medevaced to the ER. 

Share in the comments below if you would like to. This pain is not normal and raising awareness will help others to get a quicker diagnosis. 

I was able to eliminate nearly all of my pain through a natural approach – but only after I dealt with it as “endometriosis” rather than “just period pain”. 

Diagnostics are key.

 

~ Further reading ~

Heavy Flow No Mo’ ~ Drink This For a Lighter, Shorter Period!

Heavy Flow No Mo’ ~ Drink This For a Lighter, Shorter Period!

Heavy Flow No Mo'~ Drink This for a Lighter, Shorter Period!

Chloe Hodder

Founder, Green Body Mojo

eavy flow getting you down? 

Whether you have endometriosis or just unruly periods, this wonderful natural remedy can help harmonise your cycle.

Not only are your periods painful, to say the very least, they’re heavy and oh so long.

Month in, month out…

No wonder you feel drained; mentally, physically and emotionally. Not only do you have to prepare for them each month, like an endurance event, you then have to recover from them.

…And by the time you’re regaining your strength, oh here we go again.

I had a window of about a week where I felt strong. As a climber, I could really notice the difference throughout the month.

Climbing during (if possible) or straight after my period… I was like a wet noodle, but even a wet noodle could stick it better than I could.

That window prior to my period though… I was on it, pulling up on those crimps like they were jugs.

I reached the point where I could not let this monthly toll dictate my life anymore.

So, as ever, I turned to research and experiments…

My Favourite Herbal Remedy for a Shorter, Lighter (and less painful) Period

What I discovered was one particular herbal remedy that had a rather astounding effect.

…and that herbal remedy was raspberry leaf tea.

Raspberry leaf tea has long been used as a ‘women’s herb’ thanks to its ability to tone the uterine and pelvic muscles.

A toned uterus is more effective in contracting during labour, leading to a faster and easier birth. 

Think of it this way – any toned muscle performs better than an untoned muscle.

Not only that, raspberry leaves also work as a relaxant. 

You see where I’m going with this…

As endometriosis pain is often compared to that of labour contractions, raspberry leaf tea harmonises the muscular action of the uterus while also relaxing it, leading to fewer spasms in the first place. This is how it can ease the pain. 

In short, a relaxed uterus is a happy uterus!

While there are different types of pain that forge what we all know and love as endometriosis, toning the uterus may at least relieve this type of pain.

Alternatively, if endometriosis has been ruled out and yet you still have unexplained period pain, toning and relaxing that uterus is a good place to start. See this post here for one reason you may be experiencing painful periods (coming soon).

Raspberry leaves are also a source of magnesium (the Wonder Women of muscle relaxants) and iron (which you need to replenish during bleeding), along with a host of vitamins and minerals including B complex.

…And as if raspberry leaves didn’t do enough already, they also help to detoxify the body of excess hormones, just what you need for rebalancing your cycle!

My Before & After Results

 

The first time I used raspberry leaf tea, my period shrank from 7-8 days to three. 

The flow was much lighter too and with zero bleeding at nighttime. 

While I found that I didn’t need to drink raspberry tea religiously to get these results (at least a few days prior to my period and during it), I have added it to my daily morning routine (within a special endometriosis tea mix) to tone, nourish, relax and cleanse.

Fresh, Dried or Blends?

I purchase dried raspberry leaves rather than raspberry leaf tea bags. You may find a good brand of tea, though I prefer loose raspberry leaf for the following reasons:

  • Herbs bought from a herbalist are generally more potent.
  • The quantity of raspberry leaf in tea bags may not be very high. You can experiment with different quantities of leaf much easier – as opposed to stuffing multiple tea bags into your mug.
  • Dried raspberry leaves are cheaper than tea blends.
  • A packaged tea can contain undesirable ingredients such as caffeine (not what you want when trying to relax) and bleach from the tea bags (yikes).
  • You can make up your own concoctions by adding other herbs and spices to your infuser.

If you have a source of fresh raspberry leaves, you can certainly use those. Ideally, pick leaves daily during the growing season, otherwise, fresh leaves can be stored for up to 5 days. To prepare for out of season, you can pick as many leaves as you can and dry them yourself. 

How To Use Rasberry Leaf Tea

Ingredients:

  • Fresh or dried raspberry leaves
  • Optional: A tea blend, such as the one my medical herbalist recommended for endometriosis, or a caffeine-free herbal tea you like the flavour of such as rooibos. Otherwise, drink as is (delicate and sweet flavoured) or enhance with honey, lemon juice or other herbs or spices like fresh ginger root.

Equipment:

  • A tea maker or infuser

Directions: 

  1. Take a good couple pinches of dried raspberry leaf and drop into your tea maker or infuser. If using fresh leaves, you will need to clean them and then tear, cut or grind the leaves to help release the properties.
  2. Add in extra flavour or herbs as you like.
  3. Pour the hot water in.
  4. Let this steep for at least 5 minutes. Ideally, a few minutes longer if still hot. (The hot water draws out the properties, so it needs to sit.)
  5. Enjoy

So there we have it, raspberry leaves, mother nature’s mercy.

I hope this helps you too. Let me know how you get on with your raspberry leaf tea!

~ Further reading ~

NSAIDS: The Painful Truth Behind Painkillers (Infographic)

NSAIDS: The Painful Truth Behind Painkillers (Infographic)

NSAIDS: The Painful Truth Behind Painkillers

Chloe Hodder

Founder, Green Body Mojo

We all know the dangers of taking too many painkillers at once, but what is not as well known is the cumulative effect of using painkillers regularly over time. 

Yet painkillers kill more people in America than any other drug.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say this is the worst drug epidemic in American history, and nearly half of these drug overdoses in the U.S. involve prescription medication.

Reference: cdc.gov

Pain is the body’s alarm system. Continually masking it with painkillers is like wrapping tape around a burst pipe. It’s a short-term fix, not a long-term solution.

So what do we do about the pain?

For drug-free short-term fixes for pain, go here.

For a long-term plan, go here.

 

~ Further reading ~

You’ve Been Diagnosed with Endometriosis – Now What? Endometriosis in Real Terms


So You’ve Been Diagnosed with Endometriosis, Now What? Endometriosis in Real Terms.

Chloe Hodder

Founder, Green Body Mojo

Being diagnosed with endometriosis is a mixed bag. On one hand, you feel relieved to have confirmation that the pain you have been experiencing is not “just period pain”, as you were probably told
for the first 5 years of visiting your GP, nor is it
something
more malignant.

Yet, receiving a diagnosis is deeply personal and can become ingrained into our identity. While endometriosis is part of your story,
it needn’t define you as a person. The aim of this post is to step outside of the diagnosis and start looking at endometriosis from a physiological sense, rather than as an experience outside of your control. This way endometriosis can become
a whole lot more manageable.

Look at the word “disease”. Take a minute to really look at it.

What do you see?

‘Dis-ease’

Since ‘dis’ is the latin prefix for a negative or reversing force, disease is a neater way of saying ‘lack of ease’.

…Meaning disruption to body’s natural flow (of blood, nerve and lymph). 

As in nature, as in the body. There is a root, a reason and conditions that cultivate the current climate.

 

5

Climate

Chronic pain, chronic fatigue, endometriosis…

4

Conditions

A set of conditions cultivate our current climate.

While research into endometriosis is in its infancy, we know imbalances within the body disrupt ‘ease of flow’.

 

Think of the guy at the gym who only ever seems to smash out bicep curls. His biceps get bigger, sure, but overtime his shoulders draw in, destroying his posture and resulting in back problems.

Internal imbalances within the body put extra pressure on the liver and digestive system, leading to a backlog of excess hormones and toxins.

This results in a host of symptoms presenting, such as pain and fatigue. 

Yet symptoms are signals that something is wrong (so don’t shoot the messenger 😉

When you’re laying on the bathroom floor in a fetal position feeling like you’re going to throw up, pass out and implode, all at once, from the undescribably agonising pain, can it seem like the problem? Of course. I’ve been there too.

…But listen to these symptoms and they will give you clues to solving the true problem…

3

Reaction

What is my body reacting to?

When the main line of defence fails (the immune system), a chain reaction can set off a series of presenting symptoms.

The human body is remarkable in its ability to cope, so it’s reacting to current conditions for a reason.

 

Our job is to identify what our body is negatively reacting to.

I healed chronic fatigue fully and got my endometriosis under control using natural methods (no conventional painkillers or medication required) by getting strategic and viewing them as a puzzle to solve. 

Getting strategic puts you in an objective frame of mind, which I find helps to remove some of the emotional charge. 

More than anything though, getting strategic makes you pro-active. Can you heal chronic fatigue? I believe so. Can you heal endometriosis fully? That is yet to be seen. …But can you make it a whole lot more manageable so that it doesn’t dictate your life? I certainly have. 

My Results

In my early twenties, I barely had the energy to get up out of bed. Often, I would lay there for hours, willing myself to move. I dropped out of college. I couldn’t hack a job. I spent two years barely leaving my room, let alone the house.

When I walked I often had blurred vision and was dizzy, frequently passing out and finding myself on the floor. My muscles and joints ached constantly. Sleepiness would wash over my like a drug and I would be unable to stay awake. I had multiple food intollerances, brain fog and my hands were weak and would shake. 

…My GP told me I had chronic fatigue and, well, that was that. Please close the door on your way out.

So what I did was buy a laptop. I spent those two years feverishly researching holistic health.

I was able to resolve every single one of my symptoms and heal chronic fatigue fully, plus, get my endometriosis under control. 

In a nutshell, these were my results…

 

2

Root cause

At the root cause is a catalyst:
weakened state + event

Research is yet to determine the root cause of endometriosis, but what we do know if this: 

Inflammation is at the root
of all ‘dis-ease’.

At the time, I didn’t know I had endometriosis. While I had been to the doctors numerous times for my extreme period pain, I was told my options where either painkillers or synthethic hormones (The Pill) which would stop my cycle completely.

I had seen research on the dangers associated with the use of longterm use of NSAIDS and while stopping my period completely would be so very convenient, I didn’t want to mess with my hormones. Every drug has a side effect, and masking the the signal rather than treating the cause just didn’t sit right with me.

When I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis via a laparoscopy (10 years in the making), my convential options now expanded to include surgery.

Surgery would be intensive, and as the results don’t last and can cause scarring (more pain), that was out too.

What can you do when conventional 
medicine doesn’t have a good solution?

We can get back to basics by gaining an understanding of our own physiology.

So let’s go back to the start.

1

Foundations

We must give ourselves all of the raw materials required to build a strong body, repair and rejuvenate at a cellular level, detox efficively and maintain good health.

Are the foundations in place?

At the time, I didn’t know I had endometriosis. While I had been to the doctors numerous times for my extreme period pain, I was told my options where either painkillers or synthethic hormones (The Pill) which would stop my cycle completely.

I had seen research on the dangers associated with the use of longterm use of NSAIDS and while stopping my period completely would be so very convenient, I didn’t want to mess with my hormones. Every drug has a side effect, and masking the the signal rather than treating the cause just didn’t sit right with me.

When I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis via a laparoscopy (10 years in the making), my convential options now expanded to include surgery.

Surgery would be intensive, and as the results don’t last and can cause scarring (more pain), that was out too.

What can you do when conventional 
medicine doesn’t have a good solution?

Get back to basics by gaining an understanding of your own physiology.

So let’s go back to the start.

What we know is this: Chronic inflammation is at the root
of all dis-ease.

…And something can be done about the inflammation. 

  1. We can reduce inflammation through nutrition, movement, relaxation and re-balancing the body.

     

  2. We can work on ‘ease of flow’ by improving circulation, nerve movement and lympathic drainage.
  3. We can support the liver so that it can process excess hormones and cleanse the body more effectively. 

…Remove the fuel source, cool the heat and starve the fire of the oxidising agent it requires to burn.

The more we make endometriosis tangible, the more we begin to see what can be done about it. 

This takes use from somewhat of a powerless state (“this is happening to me and there’s nothing I can do about it”) to an empowered one (“I can do something about this”).

Empowered: your source of power – energy, drive, sense of self and purpose – is self fulfilled.

This is the crux.

You cannot change anything from a powerless state. Life will happen to you. You will feel uncertain, unsettled and be consistently looking for a source of power – outside of yourself.

For introverts, this could be excessive sleeping, increasing levels of isolation and escapism (this was me).

For extroverts, this could be an attachment and reliance on other people’s energy.

For either, the use of ‘pick-me-up’ substances like caffiene, alcohol or worse.

This is extreme case scenario.

 

Change your baseline, change your life.

 

For many with chronic conditions, energy is spent on maintaining a baseline. 

It used to take all of my energy to get through a boring day.

…And your life is dictated by pain and fatigue. 

I got fed up of writing off a week of my life, every month. I know for some, you’re in pain every single day. 

If your baseline ‘normal’ means being fatigued and in pain, and you don’t know what to do about it, it’s time to take the reins and get this under control.

Are you in? 

…Because unbridled pain wreaks havoc if unchecked.

I made the decision that pain and fatigue was not an acceptable part of my life, and got to work estabilishing a new baseline.

If you haven’t already, make that decision.

(The latin root of “desicion” means ‘to cut off from’. Nerd-fun.)

A decision is not a maybe, a perhaps or a hopefully. A decision is moment that changes the course of your life.

…Imagine you’re sailing. A bearing that is just one degree out, will, over time, leave you miles away from where you intended and expected to be.

Endometriosis may not be a life-threatening condition, but chronic inflammation can leave you more vunerable to other health complaints.

So while research is being carried out on endometriosis, and that will be fascinating I’m sure, there’s no reason to wait-and-see.

Will making the decision that pain and fatigue is not acceptable magically make it go away? No.

But you will.

By being in empowered state you will make the necessary changes to reduce inflammation, relieving pain and fatigue.

I’m currently mapping out exactly what I had success with, in hopes that it will provide you will a shortcut to getting your mojo back. This includes my natural remedies toolkit that helped reduce my pain to minimal-none.

At the time, I didn’t know I had endometriosis. While I had been to the doctors numerous times for my extreme period pain, I was told my options where either painkillers or synthethic hormones (The Pill) which would stop my cycle completely.

I had seen research on the dangers associated with the use of longterm use of NSAIDS and while stopping my period completely would be so very convenient, I didn’t want to mess with my hormones. Every drug has a side effect, and masking the the signal rather than treating the cause just didn’t sit right with me.

When I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis via a laparoscopy (10 years in the making), my convential options now expanded to include surgery.

The surgery would be intensive (painful), and as the results don’t last and can cause scarring (more pain), that was out too.

 

What can you do when conventional 
medicine doesn’t have a good solution?

Get back to basics by gaining an understanding of your own physiology.

So let’s start at the start.

What we know is this: Chronic inflammation is at the root
of all dis-ease.

…And something can be done about the inflammation. 

  1. We can reduce inflammation through nutrition, movement, relaxation and re-balancing the body.

     

  2. We can work on ‘ease of flow’ by improving circulation, nerve movement and lympathic drainage.
  3. We can support the liver so that it can process excess hormones and cleanse the body more effectively. 

…Remove the fuel source, cool the heat and starve the fire of the oxidising agent it requires to burn.

The more we make endometriosis tangible, the more we begin to see what can be done about it. 

This takes use from somewhat of a powerless state (“this is happening to me and there’s nothing I can do about it”) to an empowered one (“I can do something about this”).

Empowered: your source of power – energy, drive, sense of self and purpose – is self fulfilled.

This is the crux.

You cannot change anything from a powerless state. Life will happen to you. You will feel uncertain, unsettled and be consistently looking for a source of power – outside of yourself.

For introverts, this could be excessive sleeping, increasing levels of isolation and escapism (this was me).

For extroverts, this could be an attachment and reliance on other people’s energy.

For either, the use of ‘pick-me-up’ substances like caffiene, alcohol or worse.

This is extreme case scenario.

 

Change your baseline, change your life.

 

For many with chronic conditions, energy is spent on maintaining a baseline. 

It used to take all of my energy to get through a boring day.

…And your life is dictated by pain and fatigue. 

I got fed up of writing off a week of my life, every month. I know for some, you’re in pain every single day. 

If your baseline ‘normal’ means being fatigued and in pain, and you don’t know what to do about it, it’s time to take the reins and get this under control.

Are you in? 

…Because unbridled pain wreaks havoc if unchecked.

I made the decision that pain and fatigue was not an acceptable part of my life, and got to work estabilishing a new baseline.

If you haven’t already, make that decision.

(The latin root of “desicion” means ‘to cut off from’. Nerd-fun.)

A decision is not a maybe, a perhaps or a hopefully. A decision is moment that changes the course of your life.

…Imagine you’re sailing. A bearing that is just one degree out, will, over time, leave you miles away from where you intended and expected to be.

Endometriosis may not be a life-threatening condition, but chronic inflammation can leave you more vunerable to other health complaints.

So while research is being carried out on endometriosis, and that will be fascinating I’m sure, there’s no reason to wait-and-see.

Will making the decision that pain and fatigue is not acceptable magically make it go away? No.

But you will.

By being in empowered state you will make the necessary changes to reduce inflammation, relieving pain and fatigue.

I’m currently mapping out exactly what I had success with, in hopes that it will provide you will a shortcut to getting your mojo back. This includes my natural remedies toolkit that helped reduce my pain to minimal-none.

Read More…

01020306 08

Green Body Mojo


Green Body Mojo is here to help
you get your mojo back with a natural approach to endometriosis and chronic fatigue.

© 2017 Chloe Hodder

 

Boost Energy & Balance Hormones with this Breakfast Bowl Designed for Endometriosis (Recipe)

Boost Energy & Balance Hormones with this Breakfast Bowl Designed for Endometriosis (Recipe)

RESET | REJUV

smoothie-icons-final-grey
Boost Energy & Balance Hormones with this Super-Seed Breakfast Bowl
[Recipe]

Chloe Hodder

Founder, Green Body Mojo

My daily breakfast bowl – it’s sort of like yoghurt with granola, but on superfood ‘steroids’ and easier on the jaw. 

Recommended by my medical herbalist to reduce excess oestrogen, I added to the recipe by including my favourite energy-enhancing, stress-relieving and hormonal-balancing superfoods.

It has become my favourite breakfast go-to.

  • If heavier foods make you feel fatigued, this is uber lightweight and doesn’t consume vast quantities of energy to digest – In fact, don’t be surprised if it wakes up a sleepy digestive system.
  • Or, if you need a little more carb to get you through the morning, you can top this over cooked oats. 

While a fan of seeds, I’m not a huge fan of having a seed blend in a smoothie, I have to say. Happily, I found this was an ideal alternative to getting my daily seed quota. While the ground seeds may look a little dry, it is actually really nice mixed with the yoghurt.

Key Ingredients

 

 

Linseed/Flaxseed:

Linseed, or flaxseed as it’s also known, is rich in Omega 3. As our modern diet tends to be overly heavy on Omega 6, linseed can help to restore the balance.

Linseed for women’s issues: Scientists have identified a correlation between high omega-6 concentrations in the blood (a result of a diet low in omega-3) and increased menstrual pain. According to their research, menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) occur when the cell membranes release omega-6, as this produces pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. This can be experienced as cramping, headache and nausea.

Also, an imbalance of omega-6 and omega-3 has been connected to PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome). 

Maca Powder: 

An adaptogen, maca helps the body to cope with stress and restore overall balance. It’s often suggested for those with adrenal fatigue as it supports the endocrine system and boosts energy and stamina. 

Contraindications: Due to maca’s hormone balancing properties, hormone-sensitive conditions can be affected. It’s wise to consult with a medical herbalist or naturopath in this instance.

Bee Pollen: 

Similarly to maca, though perhaps less well known, bee pollen is used to an all-around energy aid and stress-reliever.

It is considered one of nature’s most complete foods as it possesses nearly all the nutrients we require. 

Bee pollen is a source of protein and also contains vitamins (inc. B-complex), minerals, co-enzymes and amino acids.

First-time users are recommended to start with 1 single piece of bee pollen under their tongue to check for any intolerance, before increasing the amount taken the next day.

I purchase my bee pollen from LiveMoor.co.uk, a natural living store that’s just down the road from me on the edge of Dartmoor. They also supply maca powder and chia seeds, though I already had copious amounts of both of those. 

Contraindications: Do not use if you are allergic to pollen or are pregnant.

Slippery Elm Powder: 

A popular ingredient in herbal remedies, slippery elm is touted for its wonderful soothing, strengthening and healing qualities. 

Plus, the name just makes me laugh every single time I hear it.

Contraindications: If you are on medication, taking slippery elm in tandem can decrease the effectiveness of your medication. WedMD recommends taking slippery elm at least one hour after you take your medication to prevent this interaction. 

Optional: Turmeric/Curcumin Supplement:

Turmeric, or specifically curcumin extract, is renowned for its anti-inflammatory effects on the body. As turmeric is fat-soluble, to optimise absorption, take your turmeric or curcumin supplement with fat. This breakfast bowl contains healthy fats in the forms of yoghurt, nuts and seeds.

Super-Seed Breakfast Bowel Recipe

 

Ingredients: 

  • Plain, cultured, dairy-free yoghurt 
  • ‘Super-Seed’ ground mixture 
  • Chia seeds
  • Bee pollen 
  • Maca powder
  • Almonds 
  • 1-2 teaspoons of psyllium hulls or slippery elm powder
  • Fresh fruit 
  • Optional: Turmeric/curcumin supplement

Super-Seed Ground Mixture:

  • Linseed/Flaxseed
  • Pumpkin seeds 
  • Sesame seeds 
  • Sunflower seeds 

Instructions:

1. Optimally, soak the almonds overnight – but don’t let that stop you from having this today. Soaked almonds will last for a week in the fridge. 

2. Pour half a cup of plain, cultured, dairy-free yoghurt into your bowl. 

3. Sprinkle chia seeds over the yoghurt. 

4. Sprinkle maca powder over the yoghurt (and slippery elm powder if you have it). 

5. Grind the seeds, almonds and psyllium hulls and then add the ground mixture on top of the yoghurt.

  • Aim for approx. 2-3 tablespoons of the ground mix. It’s not an exact science, but use a higher ratio of linseed/flaxseed than each of the other seeds. 
  • Most smoothie makers have a special grinding blade, otherwise, you can use a coffee grinder.
  • Ground seeds become rancid quickly so make fresh daily.

6. Top with fresh fruit. 

7. Sprinkle bee pollen over everything.

8. Enjoy (Optional: Consume with a turmeric/curcumin supplement.)

 

 

Want to read more?