How To Get 100g of Protein on The Endo Diet in a Day

How To Get 100g of Protein on The Endo Diet in a Day

How To Get 100g Protein on The Endo Diet in a Day

 

“I’m really having trouble eating enough protein on the endo diet. Especially breakfast since I’m not eating eggs. Any suggestions? I’m trying to reach at least 75 grams of protein a day.”

his was a question posted in my group. When it comes to a plant-based diet, there is little topic that rears its big
green head more than protein.

Ask most people what they think of as protein, and they’ll tell you meat, fish and dairy.

If you then look at vegan products, you’ll find tofu, processed soy mince and other soy products promoted as vegan protein alternatives.

Soy is not featured on the endo diet. More on that here (post coming soon).

What’s a person to do? Well, let’s break it down and look at the protein content of typical ingredients used on the endo diet and see how we can achieve 100g of plant-based, non-soy protein.

A ‘day in the life’ if you will.

…But just before we dive into consuming protein, let’s touch base on how much protein we actually need per day.

How much protein do we actually need?

Calculators at the ready, the DRI (Dietary Reference Intake) of protein per body weight is:

  • 0.8g of protein per kilogram
  • 0.36g of protein per pound

This is your basic need.

For an active person, the general consensus is more around the mark of:

  • 1.6-2.2g of protein per kilogram
  • 0.7-1g of protein per pound.

E.g. So at 60kg, I would require 48g of protein per day (sedentary) or 96-132g of protein per day (active).

Once you work out your “metrics” and familiarise yourself with the protein content of plant-based foods, it no longer seems like some challenging conundrum concocted by The Crystal Maze to baffle and befuzzle and is pretty achievable.

Below is how you get can 100g in a day. I’ve gone with 100g as this is an easy figure for you to adjust.

The skinny on healthy fats

At 5ft 8″, 60kg is my optimal weight (since lean muscle mass is a priority in climbing, which I do).

I ‘m sharing my composition as I know you’ll get your family and friends setting upon you with, “Well look at all of those nuts and nut butters; you may be getting protein but what about all of that fat?”

…And it’s a fair question. (Unlike the classic, “Well what are you going to live on – rabbit food?” Oh har har, I hadn’t heard that one before. You are soooo original and hilarious.)

That said, fats are really a topic for another post (spoiler alert, it will be titled something along the lines of “Don’t Ostracize Fat”), however,  I will say I have never, ever, had a problem with excess body fat and my life is a tahini-fest.

Fats are crucial for both brains and beauty; for brain function, for achieving optimal body composition (ironic hey given their bad press) and for the health of your skin, nails and hair.

*This post is strictly informational and not intended as medical or nutritional advice,
nor as a substitution for medical, not nutritional advice. Got it?

Breakfast

Vegan ‘Cheesy’ Chickpea Omelette = 37g plant-based protein

Protein boosting ingredients: 

  • 1 cup chickpea flour = 20.6g 
  • 1/3 cup nutritional yeast = 10g 
  • 1 cup cooked spinach = 5.3g 
  • 1/2 cup cooked mushrooms slices = 1.7g

Go here for the full recipe & instructions (coming soon)

Lunch

Protein Power Smoothie = 32g+ plant-based protein

Protein boosting ingredients: 

  • 1 x 30g serving of pea protein powder = 24g
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds = 4g 
  • 1 tbsp almond butter = 4g 
  • Alternatively, you could use hemp powder (14.7g protein per 30g serving) and hemp seeds (7.3g protein per 2tbsp)

Create a smoothie with 1-2 servings of fruit or berries and whatever greens you’d like.

To feel fuller, I’d use a banana and perhaps some cooked (and cooled) quinoa (more protein too), for a lighter option, I’d go with the berries (these can be frozen berries which are often more affordable). Other fruits can include pineapple (aids digestion), kiwi etc.

Greens can include spinach, lettuce, celery, cucumber etc. 

For on the go, you can make your smoothie in the morning and store in a sealed container. Alternatively, you can make the night before and freeze. Then sip it as it thaws. 

Go here for the full recipe & instructions (coming soon)

Dinner

Bounty Bowl = 34.9g+ plant-based protein

Protein boosting ingredients: 

  • 1.25 cup cooked quinoa = 10g 
  • 1/2 cup lentils = 10g 
  • 1 tbsp hempseed to top = 3.3g 
  • 1 tbsp tahini (dressing) = 2.6g 
  • 1 cup cooked  broccoli = 9g
  • The vegetables and any nut or seed toppings will also provide extra protein.

You can configure a bounty bowl however you’d like. The general idea is to have a portion of each: 

  1. Lentils, chickpeas or beans
  2. Quinoa, wild rice, brown rice, millet 
  3. Sweet potato, squash, parsnip
  4. Variety of salad/veg
  5. Sprouts, nuts, seeds
  6. Dressing or dip

You can use the Cruciferous Crunch with Mustard Tahini Dressing recipe and swap the sweet potato chunks for lentils and quinoa. I’ll post this version as a complete recipe when I can.

Snacks

I have included the snacks in the total, however, protein-snacks could include;

 

  • Energy balls (as pictured)
  • Kale crisps
  • Nuts, toasted and seasoned with Himalayan salt
  • Spicy roasted chickpeas

All in a days work

All in all, this tallies up to  103.9g+ of plant-based protein. Smashed it!

For more ways to add protein to your day, check out my post 10 Ways To Get 10g of Protein on a Plant-Based Diet!

Protein references: Nutrition Data or product packaging

10 Ways To Get 10g Protein on a Plant-Based Diet

10 Ways To Get 10g Protein on a Plant-Based Diet

10 WAYS TO GET 10G PROTEIN ON A PLANT-BASED DIET

 

Where do you get your protein? This is the #1 food question I have been asked throughout my life as a vegetarian. Protein is important for all of us, though, for those of us with endometriosis, protein is of particular interest when it comes to supporting the liver in removing excess hormones (oestrogen, we’re looking at you). That said, there is such a thing as too much protein and the SAD (Standard American Diet) is overloaded with it. The DRI (Dietary Reference Intake) is 0.8g of protein per kg (or 0.36 per pound) which is achievable on a plant-based diet. “Green” protein can be a bit of a concept to wrap your head around if you’re not used to it, so I created this 10g list as an easy reference for
meeting your daily requirement.

*Protein references: USDA Nutrition Database

1. Spirulina

10g protein = 2.5 tbsp | 17.5g 

Spirulina is a freshwater blue-green microalgae that is widely regarded as one of the most nutrient-rich foods on the planet. Hawaii is a prominent producer of spirulina.

How to use:  Typically available in powdered form, the easiest way to consume spirulina is by adding it to smoothies. You can also use it in recipes such as pesto or energy balls.

 

 

2. Nutritional Yeast

10g protein = 1/3 cup | 18g

Nutritional yeast is deactivated yeast (so not the kind that encourages Candida) and a relatively inexpensive health food product that is a source of B vitamins, inlucding B12. 

How to use:  Typically available in flake form, nutritional yeast is a pantry staple of mine and I use it frequently to make dairy-free cheese alternatives such as cashew cheese and in sauces, such as in pasta bakes. 

 

3. Sesame flour

10g protein = 2 tbsp | 20g 

Sesame flour, as the name suggests, is flour made from sesame seeds! As well as protein, sesame seeds are a good source of calcium which is particularly important for women who have taken the pill or other hormonal treatments and may need to replenish bone mass.

How to use:  You can use sesame flour as a healthy bulking agent in recipes such as Grab-and-Go Berry Crumble Energy Bars and in pancakes.

 

4. Kidney beans

10g protein = 1/4 cup | 25g

Kidney beans are named for their resemblance to our kidneys. Beans are highly toxic raw and must be cooked well before eating (canned beans are pre-cooked for a quick fix).

How to use:  Kidney beans, along with other beans, can be added to many plant-based recipes as a side or in a salad mix. Looking for an easy swap? Try a healthier baked potato meal by swapping white potatoes for sweet potatoes and baked beans for black or kidney beans.

 

5. Hempseed

10g protein = 3 tbsp / 30g

Hemp seeds are a complete protein, housing all 20 amino acids. Hemp seed contains the perfect ratio of omegas, which helps to keep inflammation in check, and since they don’t contain phytic acid (unlike most seeds), there’s no need to soak them before use!

How to use:  Hemp seed can be ground into a flour for many healthy snacks such as the seed balls or you can chuck hemp hearts (shelled version) into salads or many other recipes such as the Toasted Seed Bowl. 

 

6. Pumpkin seeds

10g protein = 2.5 tbsp / 35g

Pumpkin seeds are a tasty source of protein, though I do favour other seeds, such as sunflower seeds, for endometriosis. This is because pumpkin seeds can help boost estrogen levels. That said, I like to include a variety of whole foods in my diet so I do use these in moderation.

How to use:  Pumpkin seeds can be used in DIY Granolas and Seed Bars, ground into flour or sprinkled on top of Buddha Bowls and other plant-based bowls like the Broccoli Bowl. 

7. Almonds

10g protein = 1/3 cup | 50g 

No plant-based protein list would be complete without nuts! Due to their subtle flavour and creamy texture, almonds and cashews are the nuts I use the most. 

How to use: Nuts, like seeds, are best soaked as this aids digestion. I use ground almonds as a thickener in many recipes, namely sweet healthy treats, and to add texture to savoury recipes such as an Indian curry. 

8. Lentils

10g protein = 1/2 cup+ | 100g

Lentils are a pulse in the legume family. Like beans, they are available in different varieties – look closely and you’ll see some incredibly beautiful colours. 

How to use: I have never eaten more lentils than in Nepal where dal bhat (lentils + rice) is a staple meal. Lentils can bulk up many dishes, such as a vegetable hot pot. My favourite use for lentils is in a vegetable dhansak curry. 

 

9. Chickpeas

10g protein = 1 cup | 150g

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are another pulse on this list!

How to use: Chickpeas make for an extremely versatile substance – see here where I made pitta bread and falafels from chickpeas. On their own, chickpeas are fairly bland (which is great as a bulking agent), but to eat them whole I tend to season them with paprika and other spices as part of a Buddha Bowl.

10. Quiona

10g protein = 1.25 cups | 230g

Quinoa is a pseudo-grain (it’s really a seed – so wheat/gluten free) and is a complete source of protein.

How to use: A cup+ of cooked quinoa makes for a great portion of a plant-based meal; whether as a light lunch or something more substantial.  Instructions on the bag may suggest a 1:3 ratio of quinoa to water, though I prefer 1:2 since I prefer a little more texture (quinoa can go very mushy). Note: rinse quinoa thoroughly before use, otherwise it can taste bitter. 

the endo diet
lifestyle

Broccoli Bowl with Toasted Seeds & Orange Tahini Dressing

Broccoli Bowl with Toasted Seeds & Orange Tahini Dressing

Mains

Brocolli Bowl with Toasted Seeds &
Orange Tahini Dressing

We can all fall into a rut, using the same ingredients and making the same meals. An easy way to shake up mealtimes is with a different dressing. It’s been very warm here so I felt like something fresh and tangy, queue the orange tahini sauce. While there are a few different elements involved in this recipe, it’s very straightforward to make. The sauce just requires the ingredients to be chucked in a blender, the sweet potatoes keep their skin on, the toasted seeds are made in minutes with no mess and the cashew kievs are optional…

Recipe

Broccoli Bowl with Orange Tahini Dressing

Portion: 2

Ingredients: 

  • 2 medium sweet potatoes or 1 large
  • 2 red onions or equivalent shallots
  • 200g tenderstem broccoli (or 100g tenderstem broccoli + 100g fine beans)
  • 100g quinoa
  • 1 orange 
  • 3 tbsp tahini
  • 2 tbsp mixed seeds
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Avocado oil 
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp honey (or date syrup)
  • 5 basil leaves (optional)
  • Dash of paprika
  • Dash of cumin
  • Pinch of Himalayan Salt 

Instructions:

*Cashew kievs are optional. (Recipe coming soon)
.

  1. Set the oven to gas mark 5, 190 degrees Celsius. 
    .
  2. Scrub the sweet potatoes, though leave the skins on. Slice into circular-type pieces then cut in half. (If you want to speed up the cooking time cut your sweet potato pieces smaller.)
    .
  3. Place the sweet potato pieces in a mixing bowl and drizzle with avocado oil, a good dash of paprika and a pinch of Himalayan salt. Shake well and then place on a baking tray in the oven (top shelf).
    .
  4. Place the tenderstem broccoli on a baking tray, along with the onions (2) cut into segments and half the orange divided into segments. If you are using fine beans, chop both ends off and add to the tray. 15 minutes after putting the sweet potato in the oven, place the remaining veg in the oven and leave for around 20 minutes (you want the greens cooked yet still crisp). 
    .
  5. Thoroughly rinse 100g quinoa (if can taste bitter if you do not wash) and place in a pan with 200ml water. Add a squeeze of orange juice and a dash of cumin. Simmer for 15 minutes or until the water has gone. 
    .
  6. Make the Orange Tahini Sauce: In a blender, combine the other half of the orange, 1 garlic clove, 3 tbsp tahini, 1 tsp apple cider vinegar, 1 tsp of honey (or date syrup) and 5 basil leaves (optional).

    .

  7. If using the cashew kievs, grill these now for a few minutes each side under hardened through (I use a griddle pan with no oil).

    .

  8. In a dry frying pan, add the mixed seeds (2 tbsp) and stir on medium heat for a few minutes until toasted. (Some seeds may jump like popcorn!)

    .

  9. Compile on your plate: quinoa first, then vegetables (optional: cashew kievs), then sauce and top with the toasted seeds. 

the endo diet
lifestyle

endometriosis self-care

About          Join          Contact          Shop         terms

Green Body Mojo and its publications are strictly informational and not intended as medical advice, nor a substitution for medical advice. For medical advice, diagnosis and treatment please consult your physician or other qualified health providers. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

© 2017-2018 Green Body Mojo LTD

Cool Beans Mexican Salad Bowl

Cool Beans Mexican Salad Bowl

MAINS

Cool Beans Mexican Salad Bowl

This is a super simple salad recipe that lets the natural flavours of the vegetables speak for themselves! While this type of food is associated with Mexican tacos, I ate this salad when trekking in the Sahara. God knows how the vegetables stayed fresh, though our Berber guide managed to rustle this up for us on a number of occasions and I’ll always remember the freshness of the flavours and hit of hydration against the sand dunes and cracked earth.

Recipe

Mexican Salad Bowl

Portion: 2+

Ingredients: 

  • 1 cucumber 
  • 1 avocado per person
  • 2 peppers 
  • 330g cherry tomatoes
  • 400g mixed beans (200g per person) in tomato sauce (or whizz up your own with tomatoes + puree) 
  • 1 red onion 
  • Small handful jalapenos 
  • Handful of parsley 
  • Handful of coriander 
  • Small handful chives 
  • Dash of rice vinegar
  • Squeeze of lime juice

 

Instructions:

  1. Dice all salad vegetables – so 1 cucumber, 2 peppers, 330g or so of cherry tomatoes (leave a handful if you are making your own bean sauce), 1 red onion, a small handful of jalapenos (to taste) and your choice whether you dice the avocado or slice it to place on top. 
    .

    I’d recommend using a vegetable chopper to dice this seconds! Here’s the one I use or US version (Amazon Associate).
    .

  2. Add all diced salad to a large mixing bowl with a dash of rice vinegar and squeeze of lime juice.
    .
  3. Chop the coriander (handful), parsley (handful) and chives (small handful) and add to the mix. Mix well then serve up your portion.  
    .
  4. Add a portion of mixed beans on top (200g per person). If you are using plain beans, you can either blend them for a bean paste or blend a few tomatoes with some tomato puree and a dash of paprika and cayenne.

     

  5. If you sliced the avocado, add this on top and you’re done. 

the endo diet
lifestyle

endometriosis self-care

About          Join          Contact          Shop         terms

Green Body Mojo and its publications are strictly informational and not intended as medical advice, nor a substitution for medical advice. For medical advice, diagnosis and treatment please consult your physician or other qualified health providers. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

© 2017-2018 Green Body Mojo LTD

Wagamama Inspired “Yasai Itame” (Crisp Veg in a Spicy Coconut, Ginger and Lemongrass Broth)

Wagamama Inspired “Yasai Itame” (Crisp Veg in a Spicy Coconut, Ginger and Lemongrass Broth)

Mains

Wagamama Inspired Yasai Itame

My favourite Wagamama dish recreated! Beansprouts, red and spring onions, bok choi, green pepper, shiitake mushrooms and chillies in a spicy coconut, ginger and lemongrass broth, garnished with fresh coriander and lime. I adapted the Coconut Ginger Recipe from the Wagamama book and, for a less starchy option, used extra beansprouts in place of rice noodles – though you could add rice noodles if you wish. The cashews are optional, leave out if you’re going for a light, cleansing dish, otherwise, include them for a more substantial main meal.

Recipe

Yasai Itame

Portion: 2

Coconut Ginger Lemongrass Broth: 

  • 200ml coconut milk
  • 4 lemongrass stalks 
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 fresh chilli (ideally green)
  • 2-inch piece of fresh ginger 
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • Couple pinches of Himalayan salt

Vegetables (alter as you like):

  • 300g of bean sprouts (half if you use rice noodles)
  • 1 green pepper 
  • 125g mushrooms (ideally shiitake)
  • 1 bok choy 
  • 1 red onion 
  • 2 spring onions 
  • 1 red chilli 
  • 1/2 lime 
  • A handful of fresh coriander (a must)
  • Optional: rice noodles, a handful of cashews and a sprinkle of sesame seeds

Instructions:
.

  1. To make the coconut ginger broth Cut the ends off the lemongrass stalks (4) and remove the outer leaves. Peel the garlic (4 cloves) and ginger (2-inch piece). Finely chop all of the above plus the chilli (1). The finer you can chop the better since the lemongrass is tough and the ginger stringy!
    .
  2. Add 2 tbsp of coconut oil to a deep set frying pan, or ideally a wok. Heat the oil (low-medium) then add the broth ingredients (lemongrass, garlic, ginger, chilli) and saute for 8 minutes.
    .
  3. Boil the kettle (500ml worth) and add 500ml of hot water to the pan (warning: make sure the pan is on low heat, otherwise the water will sizzle and turn to steam as you pour it in). Simmer for 20 minutes until the water has reduced by half.
    .
  4. Prepare the vegetables: slice your veg thinly and at an angle to maximise surface area, allowing you to cook quickly and retain crispness. Vegetables to slice are as follows: 1 green pepper, 2 spring onions, 1 red onion, 125g mushrooms (shiitake ideally), 1 red chilli and 1 bok choy.
    .
  5. Add 200ml coconut milk to the broth along with a couple pinches of Himalayan salt and simmer for a couple minutes further before removing from the heat.
    .

     

  6. Optional: I personally find lemongrass to be quite tough, even when finely sliced (my slicing is not on par with the chefs at Wagamama’s!) so I blend the broth to make it smoother. To do so, remove the broth from the pan and pour into a blender cup. Fill a saucepan or mixing bowl with cold water and set the blender cup in there to cool the broth before blending.

    .
    If you want to use rice noodles, cook these now (a few minutes in boiling water).

    .

  7. Add 2 tbsp of coconut oil to your pan or wok (broth removed) and heat on a medium to high heat. Add the sliced veg and stir-fry for a few minutes until cooked yet crisp. Add the bean sprouts (300g without rice noodles or 150g with rice noodles) and stir in.
    .
  8. If you have cooled the broth to blend, either heat it up in a saucepan or add it to the wok with the vegetables and bring to simmer. Ideally, heat in a separate pan to keep the veg as crisp as possible, though no worries if you want to save on washing up! 
    .
  9. Add a good handful of chopped coriander and a squeeze of lime juice. Garnish with sesame seeds if you’d like.

the endo diet
lifestyle

endometriosis self-care

About          Join          Contact          Shop         terms

Green Body Mojo and its publications are strictly informational and not intended as medical advice, nor a substitution for medical advice. For medical advice, diagnosis and treatment please consult your physician or other qualified health providers. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

© 2017-2018 Green Body Mojo LTD

Turmeric Figgy Pudding

Turmeric Figgy Pudding

Breakfast | Dessert | Snacks

Turmeric Figgy Pudding

The health properties of turmeric are well researched and documented, and so has gained respect the medical field for its antioxidant profile and ability to fight inflammation. Curcumin is the active compound in turmeric, though makes up just 3%, so use a curcumin supplement if you want to access the most potent benefits. Add black pepper anytime you use turmeric and this greatly increases its bioavailability. While my recipes are vegan, honey technically isn’t. You can substitute for date syrup if you wish, though honey tastes much better in this recipe and has superior health properties (if you buy raw, unrefined honey). If you do want to use honey, if you can support a local beekeeper, you can ensure that you get it from an ethical source.

Recipe

Turmeric Figgy Pudding

Portion: 1

Ingredients: 

  • 250g dairy-free yoghurt
  • 2 fresh figs
  • 2 tsp raw honey or date syrup 
  • 1 tsp turmeric or curcumin extract
  • Pinch black pepper

Optional: 

  • Chopped or flaked nuts to top.
  • 1/2 tbsp chia seeds

Instructions:

  1. Mix the honey, turmeric and black pepper into the yoghurt (save a little yoghurt back if you want to make the white swirl). Mix if the chia seeds if using.
    .
  2. Pour into a glass or bowl, add the swirl layer if you’d like along with slices of the fresh figs.

3. Add chopped or flaked nuts to top if desired!

the endo diet
lifestyle

endometriosis self-care

About          Join          Contact          Shop         terms

Green Body Mojo and its publications are strictly informational and not intended as medical advice, nor a substitution for medical advice. For medical advice, diagnosis and treatment please consult your physician or other qualified health providers. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

© 2017-2018 Green Body Mojo LTD